How do I restore .bat files association with the system (make them run when double-clicked)?



The ability to run batch files (.bat) is a critical part of system management in Windows operating systems. Batch files are scripts that can be used to automate system tasks, such as running programs, creating users, and setting system settings. However, over time, the ability to run batch files on a system can become broken or lost due to changes in the system. This can be a major headache for system administrators, as restoring the ability to run batch files requires restoring the system default file associations for the .bat extension.

Fortunately, the process of restoring the ability to run batch files is relatively simple. The first step is to determine the current file association for the .bat extension. This can be done by opening the Windows command prompt (cmd.exe) and running the command “assoc .bat”. This will display the current file association for the .bat extension.

If the result of this command is “.bat=batfile”, then the system default file association for the .bat extension is in place and no further action is necessary. However, if the result of the command is something other than “.bat=batfile”, then the system default file association has been changed and must be restored.

To restore the system default file association for the .bat extension, open the Windows command prompt and run the command “assoc .bat=batfile”. This will reset the file association for the .bat extension to the system default. Once this is done, the system should once again be able to run batch files.

If the system default file association for the .bat extension has been changed and the above steps do not restore the ability to run batch files, then it is possible that the file type has been incorrectly associated with another application. To check this, open the Windows Explorer and navigate to the “Open With” menu for the .bat file type. This can be done by right-clicking on a .bat file, selecting “Open With”, and then selecting “Choose default program…”.

If the “Open With” menu for the .bat file type is not set to “cmd.exe”, then the .bat extension has been associated with another application and must be changed back to “cmd.exe”. To do this, select “cmd.exe” from the “Open With” menu and click “OK”. Once this is done, the system should once again be able to run batch files.

Restoring the ability to run batch files on a Windows system is a relatively simple process, but it can be a major headache for system administrators if the system default file association for the .bat extension has been changed or lost. Fortunately, the process of restoring the system default file association for the .bat extension is relatively straightforward, and can be accomplished by running a few simple commands in the Windows command prompt.

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